29 de julho de 2020 Por techvision Off

Puerto Rico

Or recall the discussions about genderless military titles, like “midshiperson,” which have yet to leave port. It comes as no surprise to most that there’s a sustained pay gap between men and women in the American work force, but today we look beyond the gap between just men and women and instead recognize how race and ethnicity impacts this divide.

The stateside Puerto Rican community has partnered with the African American community, particularly in cities such as New York and Philadelphia, not only because of cultural similarities, but also to combat racism and disenfranchisement of the mid to late 20th century in their communities as a unified force. Though, often perceived as largely poor, there is evidence of growing economic clout, as stated earlier. Stateside Puerto Rican women were closer to income parity with white women than were women who were Dominicans (58.7 percent), Central and South Americans (68.4 percent), but they were below Cubans (86.2 percent), “other Hispanics” (87.2 percent), blacks (83.7 percent) and Asians (107.7 percent). The average income in 2002 of stateside Puerto Rican men was $36,572, while women earned an average $30,613, 83.7 percent that of the men. Compared to all Latino groups, whites, and Asians, stateside Puerto Rican women came closer to achieving parity in income to the men of their own racial-ethnic group.

Although women serve in top government positions, as is the case with the speaker of the House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, they occupy only 101, or 23 percent, of voting seats in the House. On a global scale, the country ranks 83rd in terms of female representation in national legislatures, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union, the Geneva-based international organization of parliaments.

“No respondents over 50 selected the term,” while overall “3% of women and 1% of men selected the term as their preferred ethnic identifier.” The term emerged in response “to circumstances in which existent language structures fail to articulate value in appropriate ways.”

The 1990 census was not designed to capture multiple racial responses, and when individuals marked the “‘other” race option and provided a multiple write-in, the response was assigned according to the race written first. “For example, a write-in of “black-white” was assigned a code of “black,” while a write-in of “white-black” was assigned a code of “white.”

Though theCenter for American Progressreports that the level of educational attainment for Latinas has risen in the past few years, graduation rates for Latinas, at 31.3% in 2008, are still significantly lower than graduation rates for white women, at 45.8%. Driven largely by the War on Drugs, women of color, particularly black and Latina women, comprise the fastest-growing sector of the prison population. In the last 20 years, thenumber of womenincarcerated increased at a rate almost double that of men, with Latina women being 69% more likely to be incarcerated than white women. Although feminists regularly cite the gender wage gap as a scourge holding back women in the workplace, in fact for Latinas, the gap is much worse. According to some estimates, Latinas earnjust 55 centsfor every dollar earned by non-Hispanic white men.

The majority of the indigenous population is concentrated in the central-southern and south-eastern states, with the majority of the indigenous population living in rural areas. Some indigenous communities have a degree of autonomy under the legislation of “usos y costumbres”, which allows them to regulate some internal issues under customary law. According to the latest intercensal survey carried out by the Mexican government in 2015, Indigenous people make up 21.5% of Mexico’s population.

Historically, under Spanish and American rule, Puerto Rico underwent a whitening process, in particular, the island had laws like the Regla del Sacar, in which people of mixed-race origin were identified as “white”, the opposite of the one-drop rule in the United States. Mexico has no official de jure language, but as of 2003 it recognizes 68 indigenous Amerindian languages as “national languages” along with Spanish which are protected under Mexican National law giving indigenous peoples the entitlement to request public services and documents in their native languages. The law also includes other Amerindian languages regardless of origin, that is, it includes the Amerindian languages of other ethnic groups that are non-native to the Mexican national territory.

Disease model and spiritually based interventions also may be suitable for hard-to-reach Latina adults who live in Latino ethnic enclaves, and who retain their heritage culture while not adopting U.S. culture. Social workers should also be cognizant of misuse of prescription drugs among Latina adults, as suggested http://www.copenhagensoulband.dk/2020/03/29/unusual-report-uncovers-the-fake-techniques-of-dominican-girl/ by our findings and emerging research (Ford & Rivera, 2008). Addiction research has long benefited from examining attributions about addiction among treatment providers, patients, and non-clinical populations. However, no published studies have examined attributions about addiction specifically among Latinos.

In Their Own Words: What Does Latinx Mean To Hispanics?

  • The study was approved by, and conducted in compliance with, the institutional review board at a large southeastern university.
  • While Latina women are less likely than Latino men to develop substance use problems, there are ethnic disparities among substance-using women in terms of socioeconomic status.
  • First, a factor analysis indicated that the factor structure of the UAS-3AC items was explained by four underlying types of attributions about addiction.
  • The purpose of the current study was to examine whether attributions about addiction in a community-based sample of predominantly immigrant Latina women are associated with socioeconomic and cultural factors, as well as substance use frequency and type.

After the Mexican–American War concluded in 1848, term Hispanic or Spanish American was primarily used to describe the Hispanos of New Mexico within the American Southwest. The 1970 United States Census controversially broadened the definition to “a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race”. This is now the common formal and colloquial definition of the term within the United States, outside of New Mexico. This definition is consistent with the 21st-century usage by the U.S. Census Bureau and OMB, as the two agencies use both terms Hispanic and Latino interchangeably.

Cubans are mostly of White Latin American ancestry, however there are also populations of Blacks and multi-racials as well. The race and culture of each Hispanic/Latino country and their United States diaspora differs by history and geography.

The 1790 United States Census was the first census in the history of the United States. The population of the United States was recorded as 3,929,214 as of Census Day, August 2, 1790, as mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution and applicable laws. The term traditionally denotes the ethnic Peruvian mixed with European ancestry .

This census also marked the beginning of the term “race” in the questionnaires. Enumerators were instructed to write “White”, “Black”, “Mulatto”, “Quadroon”, “Octoroon”, “Chinese”, “Japanese”, or “Indian”.

Puerto Ricans and Dominicans have by far the highest rates of intermarriage with blacks, of all major Hispanic national groups. Cubans have the highest rate of intermarriage with non-Hispanic Whites, of all major Hispanic national groups, and are the most assimilated into White American culture.

First, a factor analysis indicated that the factor structure of the UAS-3AC items was explained by four underlying types of attributions about addiction. The study was approved by, and conducted in compliance with, the institutional review board at a large southeastern university. Decades of research have established links between socioeconomic variables and substance use among U.S.

While Latina women are less likely than Latino men to develop substance use problems, there are ethnic disparities among substance-using women in terms of socioeconomic status. Because of established relations between socioeconomic status and substance use among Latinos, we explored whether differences in income and education may also be associated with varying attributions about addiction among Latina women. The effect of acculturation on substance abuse is particularly powerful for Latinas .

In the Dominican Republic the population are largely made up of people with inter-mixed ancestries, in which there are even levels of African and European ancestry, with smaller numbers of Whites and Blacks as well. Over a quarter of Hispanic/Latino Americans identify as “some other race.” These “Some other race” Hispanics are usually assumed to be mestizos or mulattos. A significant percentage of the Hispanic and Latino population self-identifies as Mestizo, particularly the Mexican and Central American community. Census, but signifies someone who is conscious of their Native American ancestry with some European ancestry. Of all Americans who checked the box “Some Other Race”, 97 percent were Hispanic.

Latinx has been called “a recognition of the exclusionary nature of our institutions, of the deficiencies in existent linguistic structures, and of language as an agent of social change,” but the term has also been the subject of controversy. Supporters say it engenders greater acceptance among non-binary gender Latinos.